Jacob Schaefer

Charles Allen Thomas Emeritus Professor of Chemistry
PhD, University of Minnesota
BS, Carnegie Institute of Technology
research interests:
  • Antibiotics
  • Bacterial Cell Walls
  • Biological Chemistry
  • Biophysical Chemistry
  • Magnetic Resonance
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Photorespiration
  • Photosynthesis
  • Physical Chemistry
  • Polymer Chain Packing
  • Polymer Chemistry
  • Polymer Dynamics
  • Protein Binding Sites
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contact info:

mailing address:

  • WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
  • CB 1134
  • ONE BROOKINGS DR.
  • ST. LOUIS, MO 63130-4899
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For the last 30 years, Professor Schafer’s laboratory has been engaged in an effort to use solid-state NMR to detect stable isotope labels that have been introduced in vivo in bacteria, plants, insects, and shellfish. The goal is to connect partial local structure with biological function.​

Research

Most of the recent applications of solid-state NMR to biological science have focused on the determination of the total structure of a peptide or protein in a micro-crystal, or a reconstituted model membrane, or a precipitated amyloid fibril or plaque.  These applications have successfully adapted many of the popular multi-dimensional solution-state NMR experiments to the special demands of the solid state for samples that are either mechanically spun or aligned.  For the last 30 years, our laboratory has been engaged in an effort to use solid-state NMR to detect (with a minimum of perturbation) stable isotope labels that have been introduced in vivo in bacteria, plants, insects, and shellfish.  The goal is obviously not to determine a total structure but rather to connect partial local structure with biological function.  We illustrate this strategy with an example: a correlation between photorespiration and glycine metabolism in intact leaves of Glycine max (soybeans).  In this example, the principal NMR tool is rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR), whose use is illustrated in the figure.

 

Publications

J. Schaefer and E.O. Stejskal. "Carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Polymers Spinning at the Magic Angle." J.Am. Chem. Soc., 98, 1031 (1976).
 

T. Gullion and J. Schaefer. "Rotational-Echo Double-Resonance NMR." J. Magn. Reson. 81, 196 (1989).

L. Cegelski and J. Schaefer. "Glycine Metabolism in Intact Leaves by in vivo 13C and 15N Labeling." J. Biol. Chem. 280, 39238-39245 (2005).

D. Stueber, A.K. Mehta, Z. Chen, K.L. Wooley, and J. Schaefer. "Local Order in Polycarbonate Glasses by 13C{19F} Rotational-Echo Double Resonance NMR." J. Polym. Sci. B, 44, 2760-2775 (2006).

S.J. Kim, L. Cegelski, D. Stueber, M. Singh, E. Dietrich, K.S.E. Tanaka, T.R. Parr, Jr., A.R. Far, and J. Schaefer. "Oritavancin exhibits dual mode of action to inhibit cell-wall biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus." J. Mol. Biol., 377, 281-193 (2008).